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Dan Catchpole | dcatchpole@heraldnet.com
Published: Friday, March 14, 2014, 5:08 p.m.

Flight 370: What happened? You tell us

  • The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER that disappeared Saturday is shown here taking off from Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport in France in 2011.

    Associated Press

    The Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777-200ER that disappeared Saturday is shown here taking off from Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport in France in 2011.

It's been a week now, and the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 is officially weirder than weird.

It was a Boeing 777-200 — designed in Everett and built in Everett. Our readers know a lot more about what could have happened than just about anyone who wasn't actually on the plane. You are the engineers and mechanics who made the 777 one of the safest, most-successful commercial airliners in history.

So what happened?

What could have happened?

Let's crowd-source this mystery.

Our initial idea was to create a decision-tree survey to quantify what you think. But before spending a lot of time on an algorithm, we decided it would be best to begin with a free-form comment thread of brainstorming. Please feel free to append your own ideas as well as links to interesting theories offered by others.

For what it's worth, the Wikipedia page on this event is a pretty good overview of what's known — and what's not (162 footnotes and counting). Are there other good real-time clearinghouses of information on Flight 370?

Depending on your response, we'll consider structuring ideas and any links posted here into something of a resource.


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