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Herald staff | jloerch@heraldnet.com
Published: Thursday, May 23, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

New gardening idea: Cocktail gardens

  • If you're going to plant a cocktail garden you will, of course, need mint. Put it in a pot, though. It spreads. A lot.

    If you're going to plant a cocktail garden you will, of course, need mint. Put it in a pot, though. It spreads. A lot.

One of my coworkers emailed me earlier this week to give me a heads-up about a story we would be running in the paper soon. She thought I would like it.

According to this story, cocktail gardens are a new hot trending gardening.

I was instantly obsessed with this idea. She knows me well.

I love gardening, I love edible gardens and I love cocktails. So what's not to, well, love?

Ahem. Sorry. I'm getting carried away.

Still, I think a cocktail garden would be fabulous. And, of course, anything you would plant for cocktails could have many other uses.

Some ideas come to mind right away:

  • Mint
  • Basil
  • Celery
  • Cucumbers
  • Strawberries (any berries, really)
There's even a cocktail starter kit from Territorial Seed Company in Oregon. They are sold out, which maybe gives weight to the contention that cocktail gardens are a new trend. The kit comes with Amy Stewart's book, "The Drunken Botanist," which I put on hold at the library as soon as I heard it existed.

Then I went hunting for more ideas about cocktails gardens and found Stewart's cocktail garden Pinterest board and a detailed post, with lots of drool-worth photos, about Stewart's own cocktail garden.

If you need me, I'll be geeking out over the fascinating intersection of botany and alcohol.

Story tags » AlcoholGardening

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