The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus The Daily Herald on Linked In HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions
John McCartney and Herald staff | jmccartney@heraldnet.com
Published: Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 2:18 a.m.

Who's your Daddy? Pennsylvania gets it wrong

JOHNSTOWN, Pa. — About 500 new Pennsylvanians will get the wrong answer to the question "Who's your Daddy?" if they rely on their misprinted birth certificates.

The Tribune-Democrat of Johnstown, bit.ly/VdqMmh,reports Tuesday that a computer glitch caused the problem when the state Division of Vital Records recently transitioned to new records software.

Spokeswoman Holli Senior says the problem affected about 500 birth certificates. The software was supposed to pull the fathers' names from state records, but wound up pulling information from other areas of the birth records so the fathers' names were incorrectly printed on the birth certificates.

The state's permanent, computerized birth records are correct, however. Those with bollixed birth certificates have received a letter explaining the mix-up and instructions on how to get a corrected copy.
Story tags » Software

Subscribe to Daily headlines
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent Off the Wire posts

digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...
HeraldNet Classifieds

HeraldNet highlights

A very slow invasion
A very slow invasion: Non-native snails take over the Northwest
Girls H.S. Athlete of the Year
Girls H.S. Athlete of the Year: Lynnwood High School three-sport star Mikayla Pivec
Boys H.S. Athlete of the Year
Boys H.S. Athlete of the Year: Lake Stevens High School quarterback Jacob Eason
In all its glory
In all its glory: The North Cascades on display at the Burke Museum