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5-year-old girl stung by jellyfish in Edmonds

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By Rikki King
Herald Writer
@rikkiking
Published:
EDMONDS -- A 5-year-old girl wasn't seriously injured Thursday after being stung by a jellyfish while playing in the Edmonds marina.
The sting was reported at 2:12 p.m., just south of the ferry terminal, said Leslie Hynes, spokeswoman for Snohomish County Fire District 1.
The girl was playing in the water when she was stung.
Edmonds Beach Rangers who staff the marina in the summer were with the girl as firefighters arrived.
They worked together to treat the sting, Hynes said. The girl did not need to be hospitalized.
"She just had a little rash on her leg from the jellyfish, and they treated it with warm water and vinegar," Hynes said.
Firefighters who work in Edmonds don't see jellyfish stings too often, Hynes said.
Beach rangers believe the one that stung the girl was a lion's mane jellyfish.
Those jellyfish are more common in Edmonds waters in the warmer months, said Sally Lider, environmental education coordinator for the city's park department.
Around mid- to late-summer, jellyfish bodies start to wash up on shore in Edmonds, Lider said.
Rangers warn beachgoers to keep clear of lion's mane jellyfish on land and in water.
"You can get stung even if the jellyfish has died," she said.
The only other jellyfish commonly spotted in the marina is the moon jellyfish, Lider said. Those stings, when reported, seem to have milder symptoms.
The sting reported Thursday was the first one Lider has heard of in Edmonds this year, she said.
Lion's mane jellyfish can grow up to 6 feet wide with much longer tentacles, according to the Pacific Wildlife Foundation.
The ones typically seen near Edmonds are much smaller, Lider said.
Most jellyfish stings aren't life-threatening, according to the Mayo Clinic.
Rikki King: 425-339-3449; rking@heraldnet.com
Story tags » EdmondsAnimalsPuget Sound

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